According to the Education Department:

 

  • Of every 100 Hispanic children who enter kindergarten in the USA, 63 will graduate from High School and only 10 will obtain a Bachelor’s by the age of 29.

 According to the College Board:

 

  • Educational attainment has increased for all groups except Hispanics.

 According to Sallie Mae:

 

  • Among Hispanic students, 86% believe that college is an investment in their future.
  • Among Hispanic parents, 54% believe that college is an investment in their children’s future.
  • Among Hispanic families, 58% rule out certain colleges because of cost.
  • Hispanic students were more likely to consider living at home or attending a community college than White or African American parents in order to save on college costs.
  • Hispanic students were more likely to consider postponing college or attending college part time than White students.
  • Hispanic families were less likely (34%) to borrow for college costs than the total population (47%).
  • Of those Hispanic students who did take out educational loans, 49% stated that if the money had not been available they would have had to delay or not attend college whereas only 28% of White and 26% of African American students stated the same.

 

Hispanics and higher education fact sheet released by loan provider. (2008,

           September 17). Hispanic Outlook, p. 51.

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 Educational Attainment: Percentage of Adults with Associate Degee or Higher, 2006

 

GROUP                      AGES 25-29               AGES 30 AND UP

Total                            34.9%                          34.3%

Asian American            66.2%                          54.1%

White                           41.2%                          37.3%

Black                           23.8%                          24.1%

American Indians          17.7%                          21.2%

Latino                          16.0%                          17.8%

 

Percentage of People, Aged 25-29 With At Least An Associate Degree, 2006, Race & Gender

 

GROUP                      MEN                            WOMEN

Asian American             63%                             69%

White                           36%                             46%

Black                           20%                             28%

American Indians          16%                             20%

Latino                          13%                             20%

 

  • Between 1995 and 2005, the number of minority students enrolled in colelge increased by 50% to 5 million students. The number of white non-minority students only increased by 8%. Minority students now make up approximately 29% of all college students.
  • Hispanic student college enrollment increased by 66% for more than 1.7 million students.

 Information taken from:

Jaschik, S (2008, October, 9). Falling behind. Inside Higher Ed, Retrieved 10/09/2008, from

 http://www.insidehighered.com/layout/set/print/news/2008/10/09/minority

More Hispanic College Trends

November 11, 2008

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Hispanic College Student Trends in 2006 continued: 

  • Hispanic students come from more educated families in 2006, but that Hispanics continue to be at the bottom in terms of parental education at four year institutions.
  • In 1971, 69.6% of first-generation Hispanic college students were from non-college educated parents but in 2005 the level was down to 13.2%.
  • In comparison, in 1971 37.3% of non-Hispanic whites were from non-college educated parents but in 2005 the level was down to 13.2%.

According to the Higher Education Research Institute at UCLA as cited in: 

Redden, E (2008, October, 16). ‘Portrait’ of latino freshman. Inside Higher Ed, Retrieved

October 16,2008, from http://www.insidehighered.com/layout/set/print/news/2008/10/16/latino.

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 Hispanic College Student Trends in 2006:

 

·         One in five Hispanic college freshmen are concerned about how to pay for their education.

·         The top reason for Hispanic students in chosing their college was financial assistance offered.

·         The number of Hispanic students attending college has increased, but the number of male students is steadily decreasing.

·         Hispanic college students are most likely to attend a school that is within a 50 mile radius of home, but the number of students going beyond the 50 mile radius is also increasing.

·         Of Hispanic students, 34.8% will apply to five or more colleges whereas the number of non-Hispanic students who will apply to five or more college is only 23%.

 

According to the Higher Education Research Institute at UCLA as cited in:

 

Debolt, D (2008, October, 16). Hispanic Freshman Report Being Increasingly Concerned About College

Costs. The Chronicle of Higher Education, Retrieved 10/17/2008, from http://chronicle.com/daily/2008/10/5156n.htm.